Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Saint John

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Saint John, NB

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Saint John

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception and the Bishop’s Palace on Waterloo Street have been designated as Local Historic Places for their significant historical and religious ties to the early Irish Catholic immigrants in Saint John and for their architectural value.

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is renowned for its connection to the Irish immigration to Saint John and the community’s unwavering commitment to the Catholic faith. Between 1845 and 1847, over 30,000 Irish immigrants arrived in Saint John, causing the city’s population to more than double. During this time, Saint John was the second busiest port of entry for Irish immigrants in Canada, following Grosse Isle, Quebec.

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Saint John, NB

Bishop Thomas Connolly
Bishop Thomas Connolly

When Bishop Thomas Louis Connolly arrived in Saint John in 1852, he was faced with the task of providing a place of worship for the large Irish Catholic population. He envisioned the cathedral as a center of operations and a rallying point for all future endeavors in the diocese.

In 1853, 400 men voluntarily dug the foundation for the cathedral and local quarries supplied the stone, employing 221 stone cutters. The first Christmas Mass was held in 1855 and was attended by 3,000 people. Bishop Connolly dedicated the cathedral, and in 1885, it was consecrated with great celebration.

Bishop John Sweeney, consecrated in 1860, continued the work on the cathedral and completed the chapel, chancel, and entrances in 1861, the same year the adjacent Bishop’s Palace was built. In 1871, the Cathedral’s 300-foot spire was completed and is believed to have served as a navigation aid for ships entering the harbor. The Catholic community in Saint John has continued to support the Cathedral by making improvements and memorializing it.

The Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception is a masterwork of Saint John architect, Matthew Stead (1808-1880). Stead, who was also responsible for the Prince William Street Post Office and St. Paul’s (Valley) Church in Saint John, designed the cathedral in the Gothic Revival style, making it a major architectural landmark in the city.

Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception, Saint John, NB

The cathedral’s cruciform plan, English Gothic-style elements, and ornamental details create a high-quality stone place of worship that serves as a city landmark. The interior of the cathedral showcases arcading between the nave and side aisles with niched statuary, a clerestory, richly carved woodwork furniture in the chancel, and an ornate Lady Chapel. Additionally, the interior displays much commemorative and liturgical furniture and ornamentation from throughout the history of the diocese.

Bishops Palace Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception Saint John

The Bishop’s Palace, the second significant building on the property, is a prime example of a high-quality stone ecclesiastical building in the city. Made of ashlar masonry, it blends Gothic Revival architecture with Italianate elements. Its rectilinear massing, heavy roof overhang, and stone modillion cornice are reminiscent of an Italian Renaissance palace, while its pointed-arch dormers and prominent pointed-arch elevated entranceway are typical of the Gothic Revival style and echo the design elements of the main entrances to the Cathedral.

Click on a thumbnail to see more photos of the Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception. 

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