Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

The Parish of Maugerville was founded in 1783. Christ Church Anglican was built in 1856.

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

Christ Church Anglican Maugerville

The cemetery at the church contains the graves of some very notable people.

William Hubbard Gravestone

William Hubbard
William Hubbard

William Hubbard (1751-1813) was a multifaceted individual, serving as a farmer, lawyer, judge, and political representative in New Brunswick. He represented Sunbury in the New Brunswick Legislative Assembly from 1785 to 1792. Born to Nathaniel Hubbard and Mary Quintard, he was a United Empire Loyalist who relocated from Stamford, Connecticut, to New Brunswick in 1783, setting down roots in Burton, Sunbury County. Hubbard held the positions of registrar of deeds and wills, and chief justice for the Court of Common Pleas in Sunbury County. He married Benjamina W. Clarke, and their daughter, Jane Isabella, wed John Ambrose Street. Their grandson, Jeremiah Smith Boies De Veber, served in the Canadian House of Commons.


 

John Mersereau was born in 1735 and was a native of Staten Island.

John Mersereau Gravestone

John Mersereau married Charity (Gertrude) Van Horne around 1755, and they had five sons: John, Lawrence, Jacob, Andrew, and David. The Mersereau family, descendants of French brothers Daniel and Joshua Mersereau, who arrived in New York via England around 1688, were numerous in the New York area. Some of John’s cousins were American Patriots, with some even acting as spies for General Washington.

John Mersereau was a Loyalist who sought refuge in New Brunswick. From this point, when he was 48 years old, his life is better documented. He led refugee Company 16 from New York to Parr Town, at the Saint John River mouth, in July 1783, on the Lord Townsend.

Upon arrival, he relocated upriver to Maugerville and purchased half of lot 93 across from the head of Middle Island from pre-Loyalists Stephen and Francis Peabody. Mersereau quickly became one of the first Loyalists in Maugerville, indicating his proactive nature in establishing his new life.

He received a land grant in Dipper Harbour in 1784, which he relinquished the next year intending to join Captain Ford’s group. However, he later decided to join a group led by Dr. Joseph Clark. These groups aimed to set up entire settlements, hoping their leaders, like Ford, Clark, and Mersereau, would be rewarded with larger-than-average land grants in recognition of their entrepreneurial contributions to the colony.

Mersereau and Clark spent the summer of 1784 surveying the Oromocto River for a potential settlement site. The demand for land around Maugerville was high, but the upper Oromocto area was mostly uninhabited, making it a good place to secure an early grant with minimal opposition.

Together with ten other men, Mersereau and Clark petitioned the government in February 1785 for land grants, promising to contribute to the colony’s growth by building a road between the upper Oromocto River and Carleton (West Saint John). However, their request for larger grants was deemed excessive, and the usual maximum of 200 acres per man was applied. Despite having already acquired and relinquished land, Mersereau claimed to have received no grant.

In June 1785, Mersereau and Clark requested permission to survey lots in Blissville, and soon received grants of around 200 acres each, along with the members of their group, which included Mersereau’s sons Lawrence and Andrew, plus Enoch Gearish, William Scobey, Peter Fick, Richard Rogers, Daniel Smith, Joseph Mundy, John Bedell and Nathaniel Hubbard. Reservations were also made for a school and a glebe lot.

Ultimately, John Mersereau returned to his Maugerville lot, where he spent the rest of his life as a farmer.

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