Fredericton’s Stone Bridge

Fredericton's Stone Bridge

Fredericton’s Stone Bridge

Wherever they occur, stone bridges invariably offer their own special charm and history. That is certainly true of Fredericton’s stone bridge, which crosses the Nashwaaksis Stream, a tributary of the St. John, at the junction of three thoroughfares: Sunset Drive, Main Street, and the Royal Road.
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The stone bridge in Fredericton came into existence in 1939, following the destruction of its predecessor, a covered bridge, by a spring flood triggered by an ice jam on the St. John River three years prior. The predecessor was known as the Thompson Bridge, named after a local lumber mill owner. This moniker has remained attached to the current bridge, at least in formal documents.

Fredericton's Stone Bridge

The bridge is one among a series of at least eight bridges, boasting stone facades over a concrete core, constructed by the New Brunswick Government between the mid-Great Depression era and the conclusion of the Second World War.

Fredericton's Stone Bridge

Over the years, the bridge has often acted as a societal hub, a gathering spot for youth. It’s fascinating to ponder the number of romantic relationships that may have blossomed on this stone bridge. In its most recent transformation in the 1990s, a curved walkway was appended to the structure.

Hawkins mill in 1920 before stone bridge
Hawkins Mill in 1920, before the Stone Bridge

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