James F. McMurray House

James F. McMurray House

James F. McMurray House

This impressive two-and-a-half storey house, showcasing the Queen Anne Revival style, was designed by William E. Minue. Nestled on the east side of Waterloo Row in Fredericton, this robust wooden structure, constructed in 1908, overlooks the Saint John River from its position on the first block of the street.

James F. McMurray House

The rich history and value of this house are reflected not only in its architectural design but also in the high-profile past owners. The house was conceived by the renowned local architect, William E. Minue, in 1907 for James F. McMurray. Minue’s remarkable architectural contribution to Fredericton is well recognized with his designs of prominent local landmarks like the Hartt Boot and Shoe Factory in 1898 and the St. Mary’s Departmental Store in 1904. The Queen Anne Revival house on Waterloo Row is a prime testament to Minue’s architectural brilliance, making its mark among an array of public buildings and private homes he designed.

James F. McMurray House 50 Waterloo Row fredericton

James F. McMurray, the first owner of this house, was a successful entrepreneur in the city. He ran a photography studio of his own and collaborated with George Burkhardt shortly after the studio’s inception in 1878. McMurray & Burkhardt’s photography work was esteemed enough to be included in the time capsule placed within the portico of the newly constructed Legislative Building in 1880. Alongside this, McMurray owned a stationery store, McMurray & Co., which flourished as his main business venture for about fifty years.

The house was later purchased by John A. Reid from Mr. McMurray. Reid, a longtime president of the Hartt Boot and Shoe Factory, also became involved in local politics. He served several terms on City Council before ascending to the role of Fredericton’s Mayor in 1920. The Reid family, having resided in this house for over forty years, left their imprint on it – a striking wrought iron “R” adorns the railing of the front steps, commemorating their legacy.

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