John Johnson House – Sackville

John Johnson House - Sackville

John Johnson House – Sackville

The John Johnson House in Sackville is a designated Local Historic Place due to its architectural significance and its association with the original owner, John Johnson.

Built in 1899, the John Johnson House is a noteworthy example of late Victorian period architecture. This large white clapboard Queen Anne-style house features numerous bay windows and towers that dominate the front facade.

The house is also significant for its connection to its original owner, lumber baron John Johnson, who was a self-made man. He played a role in Sackville’s boom, which eventually led to its incorporation in 1903. Johnson, along with his three sons Oren, Seward, and Josiah, was heavily involved in the lumbering industry. His primary operations were located at Johnson’s Mills, situated between Sackville and Dorchester Cape. The scale of the operation was so large that permanent buildings were constructed on the shore, including a facility to house the portable mill, a bunkhouse that accommodated over twenty men during the winter, and barns to shelter the numerous horses needed to transport the finished lumber to Grand Anse. John Johnson purchased land in Sackville in 1897, which was previously owned by prominent shipbuilder and sea Captain Thomas Egan.

John Johnson House - Sackville

During the height of the prosperous lumbering industry, John Johnson relocated from Westcock to Sackville and built this grand house for his family of five children. He actively engaged in the community’s business life and, by 1908, had served six years on the Westmorland County Council and the Town Council.

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