Marathon Inn Grand Manan

Marathon Inn

Marathon Inn Grand Manan

Perched atop Marathon Lane, the Marathon Inn offers breathtaking views of North Head Harbour in Grand Manan. Nestled between the North Head Post Office and the Old Well House Cafe, Marathon Lane is a hidden gem. The inn consists of three sizable buildings connected by covered walkways, with a large barn situated behind it. 

Marathon Inn Grand Manan

Recognized as a Local Historic Place, the Marathon Inn in Grand Manan is one of the oldest, purpose-built, and continuously operated hotels in Eastern Canada. It has had only nine owners since its inception and remains fully functional. James Pettes, the builder of the easternmost section, was associated with ‘The Flushing,’ the first scheduled ferry service in Grand Manan. In 1898, the former Marble Ridge Inn was relocated from the Moses Lane area to its current position adjacent to the main building, now known as the Annex.

Marathon Inn Grand Manan

According to local lore, Captain Pettes acquired the Annex in a poker game. Inscribed on the sill beneath the building are the names of three men who perished in 1898, presumably during its relocation. Numerous local stories surround the inn. The Captain’s Quarters, originally Captain Pettes’ home, was moved to the site from Pettes Cove, completing the Marathon Inn ensemble.

The Marathon Inn’s architecture is a diverse mix, making it one of the more eclectic establishments on the island. The main building, situated at the eastern end of the complex, features a mansard roof and embodies the Second Empire Style. The three-story middle section, known as the Annex, showcases a shallow Dutch Colonial Revival gambrel roof with a belvedere, and employs ‘balloon’ construction, with 4×5 inch studs spanning from the foundation to the roof. The two-story Captain’s Quarters, at the complex’s westernmost point, exhibits board and batten construction, as well as elements of the Dutch Colonial Revival style that was relatively widespread throughout New Brunswick.

 

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