Pierre-Amand Landry – Dorchester

Sir Pierre-Amand Landry Home

Pierre-Amand Landry – Dorchester

The Sir Pierre-Amand Landry House, located at 3497 Cape Road in Dorchester, has been designated a Local Historic Place due to its connections to Sir Pierre-Amand Landry, its representation of English and French cultural unity, its ties to the Acadian Renaissance, its architectural significance, and its link to the New Brunswick Legislative Assembly.

Sir Pierre-Amand Landry

The house is significant for its connections to Sir Pierre-Amand Landry (1846-1916), who was likely responsible for its construction around 1872 when he married Bridget Annie McCarthy. Sir Landry was the first Acadian lawyer, provincial cabinet minister, judge, and chief justice, as well as the only Acadian to be knighted by an English king. He was elected to the Provincial Legislature in 1870, succeeding his father, prominent Acadian politician Amand Landry. Sir Landry joined the cabinet in 1878 and later delivered a record-breaking seven-hour speech in defense of Acadian rights in 1883. He went on to serve as Member of Parliament for Kent County from 1883 to 1890, County Judge for Westmorland and Kent Counties in 1890, and Chief Justice of New Brunswick’s King’s Bench in 1913. Just before his death in 1916, he was knighted by King George V of England.

The house also symbolizes the cultural harmony and equality between Anglophones and Francophones, as Sir Pierre-Amand Landry pursued education in both English and French and married an English-speaking Irish Catholic woman, Bridget Annie McCarthy. He actively encouraged English- and French-speaking communities to coexist peacefully and respectfully.

Sir Pierre-Amand Landry Home

Sir Pierre-Amand Landry’s extraordinary career epitomizes the Acadian Renaissance of the late 19th century, reflecting both the Acadian national awakening and their growing involvement in provincial government and administration. He led a group of Acadian leaders that organized the first three Acadian National Congresses and successfully advocated for the appointment of the first Acadian senator, Pascal Poirier, in 1885, and the first Acadian Roman Catholic bishop, Reverend Alfred E. LeBlanc, in 1912.

Sir Pierre-Amand Landry Home

Finally, the Landry House is noteworthy for its connection to the New Brunswick Legislative Assembly Building. As Minister of Public Works, Sir Landry oversaw the construction of the building, which was completed on time and under budget, and opened in February 1882. The sandstone used in its construction came from quarries in Landry’s Dorchester riding. 

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