Thomas Williams House – Moncton

Thomas Williams House - Moncton

Thomas Williams House – Moncton

The Thomas Williams House in Moncton has been designated as a Local Historic Place due to its association with its original owner, Thomas Williams. Williams was an influential figure during Moncton’s industrial period, serving as the Treasurer and Chief Accountant of the Intercolonial Railway of Canada (ICR). He was also an active member of St. Paul’s Reformed Episcopal Church and St. John’s Presbyterian Church and played a vital role in strengthening Moncton’s spiritual and civic communities. Additionally, he was involved with the YMCA and served as Chairman of the Board of City Assessors and Secretary for the Moncton Board of Trade, the New Brunswick Board of Trade, and the New Brunswick Gas & Oilfields Company after his retirement from the ICR in 1906.

Thomas Williams House - Moncton

The Thomas Williams House is also recognized for its Second Empire architecture, level of preservation, and Victorian era interior design and décor. Williams commissioned the construction of his Second Empire home in 1883 on the outskirts of Moncton, and it was built by Moncton contractor and builder Paul Lea and executed by master carpenter Sam Melanson. The house remained in the Williams family until the death of Dorothy Conrod in 1981, nearly 100 years after its construction, which helped to maintain its good condition. During World War II, the house was briefly used as a boarding house for soldiers.

In 1983, the City of Moncton opened The Thomas Williams House as a museum of Victorian era artifacts, Second Empire architecture, and Williams Family history to celebrate its centennial. In 1996, the Thomas Williams House was designated a Heritage Property through the City of Moncton Heritage Preservation By-Law.

 

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